SolarPlanetary LtE Now for CMO/ISMO #57 (CMO #431)  

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¤····Subject: Mars 1 February 2015

Received: 2 February 2015 at 03:15 JST

 

Good evening all

 

Red image from this evening. Sinus Sabaeus central. Syrtis Major coming into view and Hellas is clearly shown. SPC again compact but visible.

 

Best regards, Clyde

 

http://www.kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~cmo/cmons/2013/150201/CFs01Feb15.jpg

 

Clyde FOSTER (Centurion, SOUTH AFRICA)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Mars 30 January 2015

Received: 2 February 2015 at 00:53 JST

 

Hi all

 

I did manage to get a few R and IR avi's on the 30 January, but was not happy with any processed results on the evening. I had another go at processing today and although the results are still not good, am submitting "for the record". A little bit of detail visible, more so in IR.

 

Best regards, Clyde

 

http://www.kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~cmo/cmons/2013/150130/CFs30Jan15.jpg

 

Clyde FOSTER (Centurion, SOUTH AFRICA)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Jupiter images - January 25th, 2015

Received: 31 January 2015 at 03:25 JST

 

Hi all, here are some images taken under better seeing, although jet-stream was still there.

 

*


http://www.astrosurf.com/pellier/j2015-01-25_01-56_rgb_cp
http://www.astrosurf.com/pellier/j2015-01-25_02-16_rir_cp

 



http://www.astrosurf.com/pellier/j2015-01-25_02-34_ch4_cp
http://www.astrosurf.com/pellier/j2015-01-25_03-25_rgb_cp

 

 



http://www.astrosurf.com/pellier/j2015-01-25_03-42_ir_cp
http://www.astrosurf.com/pellier/j2015-01-25_03-58_ch4_cp


Best wishes,

Christophe PELLIER (Nantes, FRANCE)

Planetary astronomy and imaging

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Mars 28 January 2015

Received: 29 January 2015 at 03:50 JST

 

Good evening all

 

Weather conditions have been poor over the last week. I had a little bit of clear sky this afternoon and managed to capture a few R avi's (looks like that is going to become my standard for any remaining images this apparition), with the attached image being the best result I could get. Seeing was very poor, and altitude was 23 degrees.

 

Mare Erythraeum prominent, with Margaritifer Sinus visible. Sinus Sabeus and Sinus Meridiani can also be seen. Possible light patches in the region of Argyre. Edom /Moab region coming into view and looks very bright (may be a bit over processed). Hellas also coming into view upper left and also showing as brightish. SPC compact and clearly seen.

 

Best regards, Clyde

 

http://www.kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~cmo/cmons/2013/150128/CFs28Jan15.jpg

 

Clyde FOSTER (Centurion, SOUTH AFRICA)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Solar Images 22/23/24-Jan-2015

Received: 27 January 2015 at 07:29 JST

 

Hi Guys Here are a few images from a recent cold blue spell. New spot group AR2268 is shown just onto the disc on the 22nd. Progress is shown in both Ha (wide field) and White light.

Seeing was generally poor throughout.

 

 


 


 


 


 

Best wishes

 

Dave TYLER (Bucks, the UK)

 www.david-tyler.com
Ham call G4PIE

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Tharsis volcanoes

Received: 26 January 2015 at 23:18 JST

 

Dear Clyde,

  Yes, I read ALPO Mars Section Coordinator Dr.Roger VENABLE's comment in his LtE on your 20 Jan. image. I also find WinJupos to be very useful for various purposes. When judging the existence of large-scale delicate markings on a Martian image, however, I often prefer "my eyes" over the sophisticated software;the configuration of the three dark spots with other major dark markings as Solis L., Tithonius L., Phoenisis L. and M. Sirenum feels quite natural to my eyes. Also, it is said that near the terminator darkening zone is less critical than the sharp-edged limb area for planetary imagers in terms of producing artifacts by excessive processing.

 

  Just to make sure that my feeling above hit the mark, I have WinJuposly measured the location of the dark patches myself, and found all of them showing good matches to their real geographic positions.

Please find attached the measurement of the possible Arsia Mons (red arrowed) on your 20 Jan. R image.
 

 


 

    Good Seeing, Good Health!

 

Reiichi KONNAÏ (Fukushima, JAPAN)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Re: Tharsis Trio and Olympus Mons

Received: 26 January 2015 at 03:32 JST

 

Dear Reiichi

Thank you for your comments and also the comparison images.

I suspected that the dark spots may be the Tharsis Montes, but I did get some feedback from someone who did an analysis of my image in WinJupos software, and apparently the locations did not match. So unfortunately it is possible that the dark spots may just be noise from the processing. I also have Winjupos, so I will try and replicate what he did and see if I get the same result. I appreciate your continued interest in my images.

Thank you also for the comments regarding my friend Asada-san!

Best regards,
Clyde

 

Clyde FOSTER (Centurion, SOUTH AFRICA)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Tharsis Trio and Olympus Mons

Received: 26 January 2015 at 01:18 JST

 

Dear Clyde,

  On your R Martian image on 20 January 2015, I believe the three Tharsis Montes are quite plainly discernable as a trio of diagonal dark spots. While Olympus Mons on the dawn terminator is delicate, but I guess the southeastern lobe of the Olympus Mons Aureole may be shown as a larger shadowy patch near the terminator. Please find attached a montage comparing your image with Teruaki KUMAMORI's ones in 2003 just on the same season day with similar conditions of the viewing angle.





   Best Regards,

           Reiichi KONNAI

PS: As for your good old friend ASADA-san you remembered fondly in your email the other day, I don't think it's likely to be any connection between two ASADAs. Asada is relatively a common family name in our country. Dr. Tadashi ASADA on the Advisory Board of the CMO/ISMO is a professional planetary astronomer.

 

Reiichi KONNAÏ (Fukushima, JAPAN)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Jupiter images, 22-23 January 2015

Received: 26 January 2015 at 00:05 JST

 

Hi all,
Again average seeing for that night. Interesting very dark spot in "N4TB" at (L2 59 ; +50N), dark as well in CH4.

 


http://www.astrosurf.com/pellier/j2015-01-22_23-50_rir_cp
http://www.astrosurf.com/pellier/j2015-01-23_00-06_rgb_cp

 

 


http://www.astrosurf.com/pellier/j2015-01-23_00-26_ch4_cp
http://www.astrosurf.com/pellier/j2015-01-23_00-43_rir_cp

Best wishes

Christophe PELLIER (Nantes, FRANCE)

Planetary astronomy and imaging

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Jupiter triple shadow transit 2015 January 24

Received: 25 January 2015 at 08:47 JST

 

This was very low in the sky and seeing was terrible, also I was hampered by the branches of a distant tree. However, the three shadows and two moons are visible in these infra-red images.

 


 

Europa is to the left of Jupiter. The two dark spots on the left of Jupiter's disk are Callisto itself, upper, and Europa's shadow, lower. Next across is the shadow of Callisto, and Io itself, bright in infra-red, is also in there just to the right. Finally the shadow of Io is at far right.

 

David ARDITTI (Middlesex, the UK)
http://staglaneobservatory.co.uk
HA8 5LW

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Jupiter 2015 January 20

Received: 25 January 2015 at 08:42 JST

 

This was the best seeing morning recently. I took 15 videos over 25 minutes, and in the March Astronomy Now there will be an article where I show six different processings of this data for comparison. My favourite was the one given top right which combines all the IR data through two filters with G and B.

 


 

A fairly quiet planet all in all, unlike our turbulent jetstream.

 

David ARDITTI (Middlesex, the UK)
http://staglaneobservatory.co.uk
HA8 5LW

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Jupiter 2015 January 17

Received: 24 January 2015 at 08:04 JST

 

Seeing in the UK has been mostly awful this winter, as Damian has already noted. There was a slightly better period between January 17 and 20, when the jet stream diverted away. Itfs now back to normal. 

 


 

Herefs my image from the 17th. The shadow of Io is just ingressing.

 

David ARDITTI (Middlesex, the UK)
http://staglaneobservatory.co.uk
HA8 5LW

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Re: Mars 20 January 2015

Received: 21 January 2015 at 11:10 JST

 

Thanks for that valuable feedback Roger.

I have Winjupos, so will try and replicate what you did, for my own interest and experience. 

I am trying various settings both in AS2! and registax, and you can end up with quite differing results.

Also trying not to "overcook" the processing, but its always a judgement call!.

 

Best regards,

 

Clyde FOSTER (Centurion, SOUTH AFRICA)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Jupiter 18 January

Received: 21 January 2015 at 08:08 JST

 

Hi All,
I have attached RGB and CH4 Jupiter images from 18 January.
Oval BA still appears somewhat faded and irregular in outline.

 


 

 


 

Best,


Don PARKER (Coral Gables, FL)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: solar Images 14-19Jan-2015

Received: 21 January 2015 at 07:52 JST

 

Hi Guys here is a handful of solar images from mid January. Taking in a few prominences, filproms, AR 2259 and AR2266. Seeing was poor with bad jetstream for the earlier ones but the last two dates it was just general low altitude turbulence, where F9 and Autostakkert gave reasonably sharp images.

 

I have changed my AP 5 inch F8 for a Vintage AP178 T f9 seen here dwarfing the 90mm Coronado. I have only set fire to myself twice whilst operating the Coronado under the open Intes wedge above it.

 


 


 


 


 


 


 

Best wishes

 

Dave TYLER (Bucks, the UK)

 www.david-tyler.com
Ham call G4PIE

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Re: Mars 20 January 2015

Received: 21 January 2015 at 06:08 JST

 

Thanks, Clyde. It's a very good image, considering the apparent size of the planet.

I put your image in WinJUPOS and measured the locations of the dark spots on its lower right. They do not correspond to any of the locations of the Tharsis Montes or O.M. I do not think that they are shadows of the volcanos, either. It's more likely that they are created by the noise in the image.

I hope that you can continue to image Mars as long as possible as it becomes less and less favorable in the western sky.

 

Roger VENABLE

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Mars 20 January 2015

Received: 21 January 2015 at 03:41 JST

 

Good evening all

 

Single Red image from this evening.

Solis Lacus fairly central. Mare Sirenum, Aonius Sinus and Mare Erythraeum region all evident.

SPC bright and clear. Is it possible there is just a hint of the 3 Tharsis volcanoes?

 

A new milestone for me at 4.5".

 

Best regards,

 

http://www.kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~cmo/cmons/2013/150120/CFs20Jan15.jpg

 

Clyde FOSTER (Centurion, SOUTH AFRICA)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Jupiter Jan 7

Received: 20 January 2015 at 08:38 JST

 

Jupiter from Jan 7, the last from my backlog, now I'm on the waiting list for clear skies again

 


http://www.astrosurf.com/pcasquinha/jup150107.jpg

 

My best regards

 

Paulo CASQUINHA (PORTUGAL)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Jupiter 18 January 2015

Received: 19 January 2015 at 23:21 JST

 

Jupiter images : J150118

 


 

Tomio AKUTSU (Tochigi, JAPAN)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Mars 18 January 2015

Received: 19 January 2015 at 04:00 JST

 

Good evening all

 

Conditions a bit better this evening (and also caught Mars a bit earlier).

The RGB data is not great, but I was fascinated with the IR image. This is the first time I have captured Solis Lacus so clearly as the "Eye of Mars". Also in IR, Mare Sirenum and Aonius Sinus are clearly seen. The SPC is very clearly seen and is bright across the IR,R and G images.

Best regards,

 

http://www.kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~cmo/cmons/2013/150118/CFs18Jan15.jpg

 

Clyde FOSTER (Centurion, SOUTH AFRICA)

 

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Jupiter Jan 5

Received: 19 January 2015 at 03:49 JST

 

The boring side of Jupiter on January 5th

 



http://www.astrosurf.com/pcasquinha/jup150105.jpg

 

My best regards

 

Paulo CASQUINHA (PORTUGAL)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Jupiter images - January 17th, 2015

Received: 18 January 2015 at 21:07 JST

 

Hi all,
Here are some Jupiter images ; weather do not cooperate that much this winter... (once again)




 

http://www.astrosurf.com/pellier/j2015-01-17_01-30_rir_cp
http://www.astrosurf.com/pellier/j2015-01-17_01-47_rgb_cp

 

 



http://www.astrosurf.com/pellier/j2015-01-17_02-10_ch4_cp
http://www.astrosurf.com/pellier/j2015-01-17_02-30_rir_cp


NEBn weavy pattern as well as the dark spot at L2:284 and lat +18,4 inside NTrZ are indicating a classical NEB revival, if I'm not mistaken.


Best wishes,


Christophe PELLIER (Nantes, FRANCE)

Planetary astronomy and imaging

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Jupiter Jan 4

Received: 18 January 2015 at 04:10 JST

 

Hi here is a sequence of Jupiter from Jan 4 in v

ariable conditions .

 


 

http://www.astrosurf.com/pcasquinha/jup150104.jpg

                                                

My best regards

 

Paulo CASQUINHA (PORTUGAL)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Mars 16 January 2015

Received: 17 January 2015 at 05:43 JST

 

Good evening all

 

Set of images taken under very poor conditions. Mare Sirenum central and SPC evident.

 

http://www.kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~cmo/cmons/2013/150116/CFs16Jan15.jpg

 


 

Out of interest, I "commissioned" my new 71mm Williams Optics (piggybacked on the C14) this evening, with my Canon 60Da. Took a single 30s test exposure of Orions sword (attached) and was very pleasantly surprised. I only used in camera NR, and have not done any processing/post-processing as yet. Considering this is from a major metropolitan area, I am looking forward to seeing just what can be done from this environment and location. Will be trying to capture Comet Lovejoy next, if the weather holdscc..

 

Best regards,

 

Clyde FOSTER (Centurion, SOUTH AFRICA)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: I Dreamed of Falling: Commemorating the Landing of the Huygen's Probeon Titan

Received: 15 January 2015 at 02:09 JST

 

January 14, 2015

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

There have been many remarkable moments during our ten years at Saturn that a sentimental type would be warmed to recall. Entry into Saturn orbit in the summer of 2004 is surely one of them, and any one of the close, daring flybys of Saturn's moons -- Iapetus, Enceladus, Titan to name a few -- would give you reason to stop and remember all that we've found in the course of our time there.

But for me, the moment that moved me the most was the one that took place ten years ago today ... the day humanity landed a device of our own making on a moon in the outer solar system.  The landing of the Huygens probe on Titan was a time I will never forget.

Go to ...

         http://ciclops.org

Check out the new Captain's Log and remind yourself of that
extraordinary moment when we did the seemingly impossible and touched
the sky.


Enjoy,

Carolyn PORCO (Boulder, CO)
Cassini Imaging Team leader
Director, CICLOPS
http://twitter.com/carolynporco
http://www.facebook.com/carolynporco
http://carolynporco.com

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Jupiter 11 January

Received: 14 January 2015 at 09:13 JST

 

Hi All,
I have attached an RGB Jupiter image from 11 January. Taken with the help of my grandsons, Dylan and Justin.

Despite high gusty winds and variable seeing, we managed o savage a decent set of images, thanks to the Paramount ME mount.

 



Best,


Don PARKER (Coral Gables, FL)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Mars 13 January 2015

Received: 14 January 2015 at 04:32 JST

 

Good evening all

 

Similar view to yesterday evening. There appears to be some lightness just below the SPC, most noticeable in G. Could this be cloud? However at this size, I would be hesitant to make any absolute comment on detail this fine. Colour balance a bit of a challenge this evening.

 

Best regards

 

http://www.kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~cmo/cmons/2013/150113/CFs13Jan15.jpg

 

Clyde FOSTER (Centurion, SOUTH AFRICA)

 

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Solar Images 11-Jan-2015

Received: 13 January 2015 at 07:29 JST

 

Hi Guys Here are some shots of the larger active regions, and a nice prominence perched like a damselfly on the edge of the sun ,all imaged in very poor seeing at 17 alt. F9 proving more successful than f17.6.

 

The 90mm Solarmax at 800mm + 2x powermate soft image, is twinned with the 12:24ut white light image from a vintage AP178 f9 ( 1600mm fl) scope.

 

The Solarmax prime focus f8.8 images from 12:19ut and 12:15ut are quite sharp.

 


 


 


 

Best wishes

 

Dave TYLER (Bucks, the UK)

 www.david-tyler.com
Ham call G4PIE

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Mars 12 January 2015

Received: 13 January 2015 at 03:29 JST

 

Good evening all

 

Managed to capture R and IR images this evening through a tiny gap in the clouds (+-90% cloud cover)

 

Mare Sirenum and Mare Cimmerium  prominent. Mare Chronium visible in IR, with some detail south of Mare Sirenum. Indication of SPC with extension to the east (left)?

 

Best regards

 

http://www.kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~cmo/cmons/2013/150112/CFs12Jan15.jpg

 

Clyde FOSTER (Centurion, SOUTH AFRICA)

 

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Mo03Jan_15

Received: 12 January 2015 at 22:37 JST

 

Dear Dr. MINAMI,

 

Mars images 3 January 2015 

 

http://www.kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~cmo/cmons/2013/150103/Mo03Jan15.jpg

Yukio MORITA (Hiroshima, Japan)

 

 

 

 

 ¤····Subject: Re: May I ask a favour of you?

Received: 12 January 2015 at 07:35 AM

 

Dear Masatsugu,

   Let me put together an article on Pickering v. Lowell, with reference to their trans-Neptunian planet calculations. I will try to get it to you next few days.

   Best, Bill

 

Below, the view from the gEyrie,h Kachina Village, our place near Flagstaff, on New Yearfs Eve.

 

Bill SHEEHAN (Willmar, MN)

 


 

¤····Subject: Re: May I ask a favour of you?

Received: 12 January 2015 at 01:43 AM

 

Dear Masatsugu,

   I just got back from Flagstaffthis is the first time I have visited the place in Kachina Village where our son is living while in collegeand I spent some time in the new Collections Center at Lowell Observatory researching Lowellfs gXh calculations for a book I am writing on Pluto with Dale Cruikshank.  As you know, this is Plutofs year, with New Horizons arriving on July 14 (also the 50th anniversary of the Mariner 4 Mars flyby), while on January 13 we will celebrate the centennial of Lowellfs summary of the gXh investigation for the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  

   These things are, therefore, fresh in my mind, so I will write something perhaps about Lowell and gXh or Pickering and gOh or E.C. Slipherfs Mars drawings or????  Let me think on it today.

   I will also send you some pictures of the Clark dome and other pictures from Lowell Observatory under snowwe had about 17 inches snowfall on New Yearfs Eve.

   As for Don Parker, I believe I have heard he is very ill, though I donft know details.

   All the best,

 

   Bill SHEEHAN (Willmar, MN)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Jupiter Jan 2nd

Received: 9 January 2015 at 08:27 JST

 

My first images of 2015, seeing above average improving a little on the second image.

 


 

http://www.astrosurf.com/pcasquinha/jup150102.jpg

http://www.astrosurf.com/pcasquinha/jup150102_b.jpg

 

My best regards

 

Paulo CASQUINHA (PORTUGAL)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Re: Mars 8 January 2015

Received: 9 January 2015 at 04:43 JST

 

Hi Clyde,

 

Great details! You've definitely recorded the SPC in IR and Red shown as the bright 'cap' in the South polar regions. As Richard said it is offset to the left. And the IR shows the SPC to be mottled.

 

Continued success,

 

Jim MELKA (Chesterfield, MO)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Mars 8 January 2015

Received: 9 January 2015 at 03:37 JST

 

Good evening all

 

Managed to capture a set of images earlier this evening, with better conditions and results (although no usable data apparent in bluec.).

 

Mare Cimmerium again dominates the image, although Hesperia and Mare Tyrrhenum also visible towards the west (particulary in IR and R). Mare Chronium also evident as well as some darkening on the edge of the SPC. A little bit of detail visible in the Elysium region. Possibly just a hint of the SPC in R and G?

 

Best regards

(Allen, Kos, copying you for interest as well, although I know you guys are heavily involved in your comet Lovejoy imaging at the moment :-) . Let me know seperately whether you want me to add you to my regular circulation list, or whether I just submit to ASSA facebook)

 

http://www.kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~cmo/cmons/2013/150108/CFs08Jan15.jpg

 

Clyde FOSTER (Centurion, SOUTH AFRICA)

 

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Re: Mars 7 January 2015

Received: 8 January 2015 at 14:21 JST

 

Thanks for the comments Richard.

 

I see that there was an image by MORITA on the CMO website , which was fairly close in orientation(23 Dec), and was similar. Maybe just a hint of the SPC in his red image at that stage. In comparison, the SPC was quite spectacular given the orientation on 29 Dec.

 

Best regards,

 

Clyde FOSTER (Centurion, SOUTH AFRICA)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Re: Brightness of Mars: Dec. 31 and Jan. 1

Received: 8 January 2015 at 06:09 JST

 

Thanks Richard and indeed no major storms appeared recently....

There was a little activity over Chryse Planitia earlier in keeping with past seasonal trends.

Hope everyone receiving this reply is well, and all good wishes for 2015.

 

Richard McKIM (Peterborough, the UK)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Re: Mars 7 January 2015

Received: 8 January 2015 at 04:52 JST

 

Dear Clyde
Thank you. This is by no means an abnormal image, to my eyes. You may like to know that the SPC is asymmetrically displaced away from the S. pole as it shrinks, and on this side of the planet its N. edge would be close to the limb, so its absence is not so surprising given the disk diameter and seeing.
All the best


Richard McKIM (Peterborough, the UK)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Mars 7 January 2015

Received: 8 January 2015 at 04:19 JST

 

Good evening all

 

Managed to capture a set of images this evening. Elevation was low and seeing conditions fairly poor, so I am afraid the result is not great.

 

I can maybe make a few comments: Mare Cimmerium is visible and dominates the image (no global dust storm as yetc.!). Hellas is on the south western terminator, and shows no indication of any significant brightness. Unfortunately no obvious indication of the SPC- I suspect due to the seeing conditions and elevation. Amazonis appears to be bright.

 

Best regards

http://www.kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~cmo/cmons/2013/150107/CFs07Jan15.jpg

 

Clyde FOSTER (Centurion, SOUTH AFRICA)

 

 

 

 

¤····Subject: solar Images 25_28-Dec-2014

Received: 7 January 2015 at 06:00 JST

 

Hi Guys, here are a selection of prominences imaged over the Christmas holiday.

 


 


 

Best wishes and a happy new year

 

Dave TYLER (Bucks, the UK)

 www.david-tyler.com
Ham call G4PIE

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Jupiter December 28

Received: 5 January 2015 at 08:22 JST

 

Jupiter from December 28

 


 

http://www.astrosurf.com/pcasquinha/jup141228.jpg

 

Regards

 

Paulo CASQUINHA (PORTUGAL)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Jupiter December 25

Received: 5 January 2015 at 05:13 JST

 

Hi to all

Jupiter image from December 25th , I was able to get just the red channel before the fog rolled in, Io on transit.

 


 

http://www.astrosurf.com/pcasquinha/jup141225.jpg

 

Regards

 

Paulo CASQUINHA (PORTUGAL)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Jupiter 1 January 2015

Received: 5 January 2015 at 01:20 JST

 

Jupiter images (J150101) at Cebu.

 


 

Tomio AKUTSU (Tochigi, JAPAN)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: RE: A Happy New Year

Received: 4 January 2015 at 21:48 JST

 

Dear Reiichi

 

I was delighted to see your e-mail, and thank you very much for sharing your comments and also previous e-mails to Christophe and Bill. I hope you donft mind if I also copy Masatsugu and Masami on this e-mail, as there may be a few things of interest to them, and I have been meaning to send an e-mail to them in response to an earlier email they sent me.

 

Thank you for the compliments on my Mars imaging. It is very rewarding to get feedback, comment , and yes, even critiscism (!!) on my images particularly from highly experienced observers. Although I have had a lifelong interest in astronomy (from about the age of 9, and I am now 56....), work, family and financial commitments limited my activities. It was therefore a priviledge for me to be able to invest in a nice (motorised) roll-off roof observatory with a new C14 SCT earlier this year. Commissioning took place a little after Mars opposition, and at that stage I only had a colour camera, so there was limited value from an analysis perspective. Despite that I was very excited to capture my first dust storm in early July, and I committed to taking images on every possible opportunity. I developed a positive relationship and interaction with the Mars sections of ALPO (Roger and Jim) and the BAA (Richard). It became very evident to me the value of filtered images, and in August I purchased a mono camera and filterwheel set, and commenced climbing the huge Image processing mountain! When I look back on some of the early attempts, I am a bit embarressed, but it is all part of the learning curve that every serious imager must go through. Advice from Christophe and a number of other experienced imagers was very much appreciated. One thing I do know is that I still have a lot to learn (I was priviledged to get advice from Don Parker, which as yet, I have not managed to incorporate in my image processing procedures, so I hope that that will improve my images even further). Colour balance is certainly one of the biggest challenges for me.

 

It was shortly after this that I became aware of the CMO/ISMO and started submitting my images. I was very impressed with the commitment and effort that was (and is) put in to comment on every image that is submitted in the CMO. This is what I would call a "labour of love", and provides an excellent service and resource for Mars observers.

 

Together with the imaging, I purchased a number of good reference books on Mars so that I could better understand the planet and what I was imaging. I also discovered the MRO MARCI weather report, and as you have already noted, I found it fascinating to see "my" dust storms imaged from from a Mars orbiter (albeit 1-3 weeks later). One thing I noted in comparing my images with MRO is that the main albedo features are often seen better from earth that they are from Mars orbit!

 

It is certainly my intention to continue imaging in this apparition as long as I can, although with us in the middle of summer now, the elevation of Mars is dropping by the time it starts becoming dark. I have also found that seeing conditions are best during twilight, so a few things are starting to work against me. It is very difficult to capture a reasonable blue image under these conditions, so I may shortly be limited to R and IR images. One good thing about this is that it should still be possible to identify any major dust storm activity. We shall see, as weather conditions have been poor for a number of weeks now in the area where I live.

 

I was interested in your comments regarding visual observing and imaging. If I understand you, you see imaging as a direct/natural extension of visual observing, rather than competing with visual observing. As an engineer, I have really enjoyed the full experience from the setting up of the equipment and  imaging train, to the capturing of the images, and the multi-step processing procedures, through to assessing the quality and information in the final image.  Let me also add that one of the greatest pleasures for me after a hard days work is to retreat to my back garden, roll the roof off the observatory and look to the skies..... What a priviledge, and a wonderful way to relax and de-stress!  I guess what I am saying that this hobby goes far beyond a purely technical pastime but definitely extends to aesthetic if not even spiritual levels. I have huge respect for those who still prefer to do visual (I believe this is your speciality?) observing. At the end of the day, I believe we are all striving for the same thing- to capture, interpret and understand what we can, to the best of our abilities.

 

I am not sure that at this stage I can be classified as an "thinking/analysing imager" , but I can assure you that this is a title that I can(and will) definitely aspire to!!

 

Just as a bit of a side anecdote, I see that there is a Mr ASADA who is on the Advisory board of the CMO/ISMO. This reminds me of when I was a young Chemical Engineer back in the 1980's. I was involved in a pilot(test) project  at one of the South African Power stations where Japanese technology was being considered for purifying contaminated water. It was EDR (Reverse Electrodialysis) technology from a company called Asahi Glass Co (if I recall correctly). The point being is that they sent out a young japanes engineer (also Mr ASADA) who I worked with at the power station. We worked well together and spent a lot of time discussing Japanese culture, and also drank a bit (maybe it was more than that....!!) of Suntory whiskey! As friends, I would refer to him as "Asada-san" and he called me "Foster-san". I do not know how common this name is in Japan, and if there may be any connection between the two "Mr ASADA's"?

 

Thank you again for your comments and feedback, and I look forward to further interaction with you and the CMO/ISMO

 

Finally, I would like to wish you (and Masatsugu and Masami) , a happy, healthy and prosperous 2015. Let us hope for clear skies and good seeing, and possibly a major dust storm on Mars in the next few weeks!!

 

Best regards

Clyde

 

------------------------------------------------------------------

Sent: 04 January 2015 11:24 AM

To: Clyde Foster

Subject: A Happy New Year

 

Dear Clyde (if I may),

 

  Checking emails sent to me last year, I have just discoverd your email dated 28 Octber 2014 in my spam folder! (don't know the reason why) ...Most sorry for not contacting you sooner!

 

  Your indefatigable focus on your observing Mars is really great, and I am happy to learn your recovery from the back surgery to be able to get still detail-rich images of the red planet below 5"!...I fancy observers on the imaginary antipodal-on-orbit-Earth would be enjoying a favorable approach of Mars with its southern summer...  Though the MRO MARCI weather reporter commented as "Based on recent major regional storm activity and comparisons with the historical storm records, a planet-encircling dust event (PEDE) is unlikely (< 50%) to occur in the remainder of this martian year." in their release for the week of 1 Dec.-7 Dec., it's still in the major dust season, and the Earth-based patrol is still valuable for the early detection of the outbreak of the major meteorological event, because the images(though superb) of HST and the Mars orbiting probes are quite sporadic in releasing(even MRO MARCI Weather Report takes 1~3 weeks in updating).

 

  One more your special characteristic I noticed is that you are an "thinking/analysing imager". Let me here paste the copy of my email to Christophe Pellier (Cced to Bill Sheehan also) on 21 Dec. 2012, and the one to Bill Sheehan on 2 March 2013, sorry they're a bit lengthy:

 

 Dear Christophe, I have just completed and submitted my translation of your 11/12 note#7 for CMO#405 Japanese version. It's very interesting! I think I could have managed to catch the Tharsis bright morning fog a few times visually in the last apparition, as a bit light (not bluish) triangular area in the morning side. Attached are some of such drawings. I guess the bright fog was still  visible/imageable untill at around Ls120.

  By the way, I have also translated Bill Sheehan's very important opening essay for #405 Japanese. Did you read that? The theme is quite heavy and oppressive, related to the fate and the future of ISMO/CMO, but I think someone have to take on the subject sooner or later, and Bill is one of the best persons for now. I myself have a plan to write something on the theme with a titlegCMO or Earth-Sized Argus--The Brain of the Hundred-Eyed Super Giant is An Super Experienced Visual Observerh, in which I will admit that the rare species of classical visual observers is a dying breed, but the way of thinking like our GM have acquired through his sheer length of visual observation time will remain useful in analysing digital images, because, I believe, CCD planetary obsevation in a way is very much alike visual obsevation, an experienced CCD imager's telescope/imaging/processing system is practically within his  visual system, his telescope is his gBig Eyehprojected deep into the Solar System, hisgDigitalhprocessing is very much analogue in handling processing, results in an image pleasing to his gEyesh. I certainly recall that my old good friend Tomio Akutsu in Cebu once suffered from severe psychosomatic problem when a violent typhoon blew down his C-14 to crash onto the floorG that's quite understandableGhe lost his Big Eye!

  GM(for Grand MassyFour secret nickname for unreplaceable Masatsugu, Bill), the brain of the Earth-Sized Hundred Eyed Giant(mostly digital eyes for now!) is carrying out the final image processing in the center of ARGUSFforF

gthe Areoholic Reconnaissance Global Union consists of hundreds of observing Stationsh@or gAreoholic Reconnaissance Group with Uninterrupted longitudinal coverage of observing Stationsh  or gAreoholic Reconnaissance Group United by Sympathy (or Soul or Show-off, or Self-assertiveness(!?))h ccWhoops,@I'm no good at punning!

             Best Regards,

                     Reiichi Konnai

 

Dear Bill,

@This time I am deeply moved by yourgwell-planned programh of stimulation therapy to encourage our irreplaceable Masatsugu in his failing health, and to reactivate CMO/ISMO with hosts of pending problems such as the chronic shortage of writers/analysts, uncertain successors to the present editorial board, and etc.,etc.c. You are certainly an admirable psychiatrist, as well as an exquisite astronomy historian!

 

  I remember your writing in your LtE the other day that my ARGUS essay might offer a more optimistic assessment of the situation than your ones. Actually however, I am rather (not quite) pessimistic about the future of CMO/ISMO. CMO is, as you know well, an unprecedented and probably the last singular field which had been created some thirty years ago by Masatsugu MINAMI as an antithesis of the previous defective observing/analysing systems of Mars, with which the dream of well-planned program of classical Mars observation finally came true, to which visual/digital observers world over could have been submitting their records to find their raison d'être promptly. It's astonishing (and it feels unstable at the same time/on the other hand) that the integrity of the Martians' Shangri-Laish zone have been preserved practically solely by Masatsugu, an unprecedented and presumably the final PURE MARTIAN/visual sketcher on this blue planet. As for your phrase in your Night Thoughts essay Part One,gCan replacements even be found?hcCan't at all, I dare say for now. So, I believe, we have to be confronted with some changes in the system of CMO/ISMO in the near future.

  In my future essay I'm going to classify the astronomers (both amateur and professional) constitute the CMO/ISMO according to the motivations of continuing their observations to seek ways for the individualistic glonersh to coexist peacefully and fruitfully as have been proven unimpossible by Dr. Masatsugu MINAMI.

 

    Best Wishes,

             Reiichi KONNAI

 

....Yes, I feel, our GM with his charisma:exceptional brain, over ten thousand career visual observations,and the excellent command of languages as well...have built up the world of amateur Mars observation to a kind of "vertical specalization/division of labor" system:the central analyst, and the imagers and the sketchers the world over.

  The system have been working quite succesfully..., but GM is now 76 years old with serious illnesses (I am aged 64 by the way!).

 

   Now is the time we need "thinking/analysing imagers"...in this sence also, you are one of the stars of hope!

 

   Belated but a Happy New Year 2015 with a good health!

 

      With Best Regards,

 

                      Reiichi

------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Clyde FOSTER (Centurion, SOUTH AFRICA)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Jupiter December 22

Received: 4 January 2015 at 07:22 JST

 

Jupiter on December 22 with  Callisto in transit

 


http://www.astrosurf.com/pcasquinha/jup141222.jpg

 

Regards

 

Paulo CASQUINHA (PORTUGAL)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Brightness of Mars: Dec. 31 and Jan. 1

Received: 2 January 2015 at 03:09 JST

 

Hello Don, Masami and Richard:

 

I was able to use an SSP-3 photometer along with a  3.5 inch Maksutov telescope to measure the brightness of Mars on Dec. 31.992, 2014 and Jan. 1.014, 2015.  

 

The results are:

 

Dec. 31.992, 2014:            +1.16                     Central meridian longitude = 35 degrees west

Jan. 1.014, 2015:               +1.16                     Central meridian longitude = 43 degrees west

 

These results are 0.01 magnitudes dimmer than those in Mallama (2007).   This is consistent with there being no major dust storm in the Chryse region.  All measurements were made near Barnesville, GA USA. 

 

Richard SCHMUDE, Jr. (Barnesville, GA)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Mo23Dec_14.

Received: 1 January 2015 at 17:34 JST

 

Dear Dr. MINAMI,

 

A happy new year 2015.

 

Mars images 23 December 2014

http://www.kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~cmo/cmons/2013/141223/Mo23Dec14.jpg

 

Yukio MORITA (Hiroshima, Japan)

 

 

 

¤····Subject: Happy new year 2015.

Received: 31 December 2014 at 22:54 JST

 

 


May the new year bring you greater heights of success and prosperity.

Have a happy new year!

 

Zlatko F. KOVACEVIC (Virovitica, CROATIA)

 


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