LtE in CMO #280

From David R KLASSEN



. . . . . . .Date: Tue, 07 Oct 2003 16:43:16 -0400

From: David Klassen <klassen@rowan.edu>

To: marswatch@cobain.rowan.edu

Subject: MarsWatch 2003 October Newsletter

 

O-> O-> O-> O-> O-> O-> O-> O-> O-> O-> O-> O-> O-> O-> O-> O->

 

THE INTERNATIONAL MARSWATCH ELECTRONIC NEWSLETTER

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Volume 6; Issue 4

Oct 8, 2003

Circulation: 1056

 

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Greetings Mars Observers! My appologies for the missing September issue; new building, new office, new class textbook, new house, and observing run prep. Enough excuses --- onto Mars!

 

(1) October Ephemerides

(2) Observations and Possible Dust Activity

(3) Mars Explorer Rovers

(4) Mars Express

(5) Mars Odyssey

(6) Mars Global Surveyor

 

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October Ephemerides

 

The following table was generated using JPL's online ephemerides site. Times are all Local Daylight Time for mid-latitude sites. For Local Standard Time, just subtract an hour. Dates and times are given for Mars rise (r), transit (t), and set (s). The C, N, A and * in the second column stand for civil, nautical and astronomical twilight and day light, respectively. Ob-lon is the longitude on Mars facing the observer (also called CM); Ob-lat is the corresponding latitude.

 

Date_(ZONE)_HR:MN R.A._(ICRF/J2000.0)_DEC APmag Ang-dia Ob-lon Ob-lat Cnst

2003-Oct-01 02:39 t 22 15 38.19 -15 40 43.9 -2.11 20.670 63.75 -20.24 Aqr

2003-Oct-01 07:47 s 22 15 38.28 -15 39 29.1 -2.10 20.626 138.80 -20.26 Aqr

2003-Oct-01 21:27 *r 22 15 43.88 -15 36 14.5 -2.09 20.513 338.57 -20.31 Aqr

2003-Oct-02 02:36 t 22 15 44.49 -15 35 02.8 -2.08 20.471 53.86 -20.33 Aqr

2003-Oct-02 07:44 s 22 15 45.25 -15 33 44.5 -2.07 20.427 128.90 -20.35 Aqr

2003-Oct-02 21:23 *r 22 15 52.58 -15 30 20.7 -2.05 20.314 328.42 -20.40 Aqr

2003-Oct-03 02:32 t 22 15 53.86 -15 29 05.4 -2.05 20.272 43.71 -20.42 Aqr

2003-Oct-03 07:40 s 22 15 55.29 -15 27 43.6 -2.04 20.228 118.75 -20.44 Aqr

2003-Oct-03 21:19 *r 22 16 04.33 -15 24 10.5 -2.02 20.114 318.26 -20.49 Aqr

2003-Oct-04 02:28 t 22 16 06.28 -15 22 51.8 -2.02 20.073 33.54 -20.51 Aqr

2003-Oct-04 07:37 s 22 16 08.37 -15 21 26.3 -2.01 20.029 108.82 -20.53 Aqr

2003-Oct-04 21:15 *r 22 16 19.09 -15 17 44.5 -1.99 19.915 308.09 -20.59 Aqr

2003-Oct-05 02:24 t 22 16 21.69 -15 16 22.3 -1.99 19.874 23.37 -20.61 Aqr

2003-Oct-05 07:34 s 22 16 24.45 -15 14 53.2 -1.98 19.830 98.89 -20.63 Aqr

2003-Oct-05 21:11 *r 22 16 36.82 -15 11 02.9 -1.96 19.716 297.90 -20.68 Aqr

2003-Oct-06 02:21 t 22 16 40.08 -15 09 37.1 -1.96 19.675 13.42 -20.71 Aqr

2003-Oct-06 07:31 s 22 16 43.48 -15 08 04.8 -1.95 19.631 88.93 -20.73 Aqr

2003-Oct-06 21:07 *r 22 16 57.48 -15 04 06.2 -1.93 19.518 287.70 -20.78 Aqr

2003-Oct-07 02:17 t 22 17 01.38 -15 02 37.1 -1.93 19.476 3.21 -20.81 Aqr

2003-Oct-07 07:28 s 22 17 05.43 -15 01 01.3 -1.92 19.432 78.97 -20.83 Aqr

2003-Oct-07 21:03 *r 22 17 21.03 -14 56 54.7 -1.90 19.320 277.48 -20.89 Aqr

2003-Oct-08 02:14 t 22 17 25.56 -14 55 22.2 -1.89 19.278 353.24 -20.91 Aqr

2003-Oct-08 07:24 s 22 17 30.22 -14 53 43.6 -1.89 19.235 68.75 -20.93 Aqr

2003-Oct-08 20:59 *r 22 17 47.41 -14 49 28.9 -1.87 19.123 267.25 -20.99 Aqr

2003-Oct-09 02:10 t 22 17 52.56 -14 47 53.2 -1.86 19.081 343.00 -21.01 Aqr

2003-Oct-09 07:21 s 22 17 57.86 -14 46 11.4 -1.86 19.038 58.76 -21.03 Aqr

2003-Oct-09 20:55 *r 22 18 16.58 -14 41 49.0 -1.84 18.926 257.01 -21.09 Aqr

2003-Oct-10 02:07 t 22 18 22.36 -14 40 10.0 -1.83 18.885 333.00 -21.12 Aqr

2003-Oct-10 07:19 s 22 18 28.28 -14 38 24.9 -1.83 18.841 49.00 -21.14 Aqr

2003-Oct-10 20:51 *r 22 18 48.49 -14 33 55.5 -1.81 18.731 246.75 -21.20 Aqr

2003-Oct-11 02:03 t 22 18 54.88 -14 32 13.5 -1.80 18.690 322.75 -21.22 Aqr

2003-Oct-11 07:16 s 22 19 01.41 -14 30 25.2 -1.80 18.646 38.98 -21.25 Aqr

2003-Oct-11 20:47 *r 22 19 23.10 -14 25 48.7 -1.78 18.537 236.49 -21.31 Aqr

2003-Oct-12 02:00 t 22 19 30.09 -14 24 03.5 -1.77 18.495 312.72 -21.33 Aqr

2003-Oct-12 07:13 s 22 19 37.22 -14 22 12.3 -1.77 18.452 28.95 -21.35 Aqr

2003-Oct-12 20:43 *r 22 20 00.35 -14 17 28.8 -1.75 18.343 226.21 -21.41 Aqr

2003-Oct-13 01:57 t 22 20 07.95 -14 15 40.4 -1.74 18.302 302.68 -21.44 Aqr

2003-Oct-13 07:10 s 22 20 15.65 -14 13 46.6 -1.73 18.259 18.91 -21.46 Aqr

2003-Oct-13 20:40 *r 22 20 40.22 -14 08 56.0 -1.72 18.151 216.16 -21.52 Aqr

2003-Oct-14 01:53 t 22 20 48.37 -14 07 05.1 -1.71 18.110 292.38 -21.55 Aqr

2003-Oct-14 07:07 s 22 20 56.67 -14 05 08.3 -1.70 18.068 8.85 -21.57 Aqr

2003-Oct-14 20:36 *r 22 21 22.62 -14 00 11.0 -1.69 17.961 205.85 -21.63 Aqr

2003-Oct-15 01:50 t 22 21 31.35 -13 58 17.1 -1.68 17.920 282.32 -21.66 Aqr

2003-Oct-15 07:05 s 22 21 40.24 -13 56 17.3 -1.67 17.878 359.03 -21.68 Aqr

2003-Oct-15 20:32 *r 22 22 07.52 -13 51 14.0 -1.66 17.771 195.54 -21.75 Aqr

2003-Oct-16 01:47 t 22 22 16.83 -13 49 17.0 -1.65 17.731 272.24 -21.77 Aqr

2003-Oct-16 07:02 s 22 22 26.27 -13 47 14.6 -1.64 17.689 348.95 -21.80 Aqr

2003-Oct-16 20:28 *r 22 22 54.87 -13 42 05.1 -1.63 17.584 185.21 -21.86 Aqr

2003-Oct-17 01:44 t 22 23 04.76 -13 40 05.2 -1.62 17.544 262.16 -21.88 Aqr

2003-Oct-17 06:59 s 22 23 14.74 -13 38 00.2 -1.61 17.502 338.86 -21.91 Aqr

2003-Oct-17 20:25 *r 22 23 44.66 -13 32 44.2 -1.60 17.397 175.11 -21.97 Aqr

2003-Oct-18 01:41 t 22 23 55.08 -13 30 41.7 -1.59 17.358 252.06 -21.99 Aqr

2003-Oct-18 06:57 s 22 24 05.63 -13 28 33.9 -1.58 17.316 329.00 -22.02 Aqr

2003-Oct-18 20:21 *r 22 24 36.78 -13 23 12.4 -1.57 17.213 164.76 -22.08 Aqr

2003-Oct-19 01:38 t 22 24 47.77 -13 21 06.9 -1.56 17.173 241.94 -22.11 Aqr

2003-Oct-19 06:54 s 22 24 58.83 -13 18 56.7 -1.55 17.132 318.89 -22.13 Aqr

2003-Oct-19 20:18 *r 22 25 31.26 -13 13 29.0 -1.54 17.030 154.64 -22.20 Aqr

2003-Oct-20 01:35 t 22 25 42.76 -13 11 21.1 -1.53 16.991 231.82 -22.22 Aqr

2003-Oct-20 06:52 s 22 25 54.37 -13 09 08.1 -1.52 16.950 309.01 -22.25 Aqr

2003-Oct-20 20:14 *r 22 26 27.97 -13 03 35.1 -1.51 16.849 144.26 -22.31 Aqr

2003-Oct-21 01:32 t 22 26 40.01 -13 01 24.3 -1.50 16.810 221.69 -22.34 Aqr

2003-Oct-21 06:50 s 22 26 52.17 -12 59 08.6 -1.49 16.769 299.11 -22.36 Aqr

2003-Oct-21 20:10 *r 22 27 26.91 -12 53 30.5 -1.48 16.669 133.88 -22.43 Aqr

2003-Oct-22 01:29 t 22 27 39.49 -12 51 16.9 -1.47 16.631 211.54 -22.45 Aqr

2003-Oct-22 06:47 s 22 27 52.15 -12 48 58.9 -1.46 16.590 288.97 -22.48 Aqr

2003-Oct-22 20:07 *r 22 28 28.08 -12 43 14.9 -1.45 16.492 123.72 -22.54 Aqr

2003-Oct-23 01:26 t 22 28 41.15 -12 40 59.0 -1.44 16.453 201.39 -22.56 Aqr

2003-Oct-23 06:45 s 22 28 54.33 -12 38 38.3 -1.44 16.413 279.05 -22.59 Aqr

2003-Oct-23 20:03 *r 22 29 31.35 -12 32 49.4 -1.42 16.316 113.32 -22.65 Aqr

2003-Oct-24 01:23 t 22 29 44.94 -12 30 30.8 -1.41 16.278 191.22 -22.68 Aqr

2003-Oct-24 06:43 s 22 29 58.65 -12 28 07.4 -1.41 16.238 269.13 -22.71 Aqr

2003-Oct-24 20:00 *r 22 30 36.76 -12 22 13.3 -1.39 16.142 103.14 -22.77 Aqr

2003-Oct-25 01:20 t 22 30 50.83 -12 19 52.4 -1.38 16.104 181.04 -22.79 Aqr

2003-Oct-25 06:41 s 22 31 05.05 -12 17 26.4 -1.38 16.065 259.19 -22.82 Aqr

2003-Oct-25 19:56 *r 22 31 44.19 -12 11 27.7 -1.36 15.970 92.71 -22.88 Aqr

2003-Oct-26 01:17 t 22 31 58.77 -12 09 04.0 -1.35 15.933 170.86 -22.91 Aqr

2003-Oct-26 06:38 s 22 32 13.45 -12 06 35.9 -1.35 15.894 249.00 -22.93 Aqr

2003-Oct-26 19:53 *r 22 32 53.69 -12 00 31.8 -1.33 15.800 82.52 -23.00 Aqr

2003-Oct-27 01:15 t 22 33 08.76 -11 58 05.4 -1.33 15.763 160.90 -23.02 Aqr

2003-Oct-27 06:36 s 22 33 23.90 -11 55 35.1 -1.32 15.725 239.04 -23.05 Aqr

2003-Oct-27 19:50 *r 22 34 05.15 -11 49 26.2 -1.30 15.632 72.31 -23.11 Aqr

2003-Oct-28 01:12 t 22 34 20.67 -11 46 57.7 -1.30 15.595 150.69 -23.13 Aqr

2003-Oct-28 06:34 s 22 34 36.30 -11 44 24.9 -1.29 15.557 229.08 -23.16 Aqr

2003-Oct-28 19:46 *r 22 35 18.48 -11 38 11.7 -1.27 15.466 61.85 -23.22 Aqr

2003-Oct-29 01:09 t 22 35 34.49 -11 35 40.6 -1.27 15.430 140.48 -23.25 Aqr

2003-Oct-29 06:32 s 22 35 50.59 -11 33 05.2 -1.26 15.392 219.10 -23.27 Aqr

2003-Oct-29 19:43 *r 22 36 33.73 -11 26 47.5 -1.25 15.302 51.63 -23.33 Aqr

2003-Oct-30 01:07 t 22 36 50.21 -11 24 13.8 -1.24 15.266 130.49 -23.36 Aqr

2003-Oct-30 06:30 s 22 37 06.74 -11 21 36.5 -1.23 15.229 209.11 -23.39 Aqr

2003-Oct-30 19:40 *r 22 37 50.80 -11 15 14.3 -1.22 15.140 41.39 -23.45 Aqr

2003-Oct-31 01:04 t 22 38 07.69 -11 12 38.6 -1.21 15.104 120.25 -23.47 Aqr

2003-Oct-31 06:28 s 22 38 24.68 -11 09 58.8 -1.20 15.067 199.12 -23.50 Aqr

2003-Oct-31 19:36 *r 22 39 09.58 -11 03 32.8 -1.19 14.980 30.90 -23.56 Aqr

 

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Observations and Possible Dust Activity

 

Thanks go out to Steve Noonan, Rowan computer science major, for giving the MarsWatch 2003 images pages a major overhaul! The image pages are now served up on-the-fly and built automagically by a nice PHP script (no, I don't know what PHP means, either). The job of maintaining those pages has been made significantly easier --- basically, I just have to move the images from the ftp directory to the web directory! This should also speed up the turn-around time between submission and posting.

 

Images from the end of September and early October still show the South Polar Cap quite well. The only indications of ice clouds (bright in blue) appear on the limb and terminator with some indications still of a north polar hood. There also appear to be some clouds located over the high volcanic peaks in Tharsis. Based on preliminary looks at infrared imaging from the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (images to appear on the site as

soon as my students finish the processing) show the clouds around Tharsis to be composed mainly of water ice while the SPC is almost entirely composed of carbon dioxide. Further analysis will be necessary to substantiate

these initial interpretations.

 

An image from 5 October seems to show a strong Red brightening west of the Hellas basin. Could this be the beginnings of a dust storm? I hope everyone will be looking carefully at this area over the next few days!

 

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Mars Explorer Rovers

 

No new reports have crossed my inbox recently so I believe this is a

case of "no news is good news". Both craft are on their way and have

checked-out AOK on all their preliminary instrument tests.

 

The various MER teams have been conducting readiness tests focusing

on the "Impact to Egress" phase of the mission. That is, from when

they bounce-down to when the packages open and the rovers begin

their roving. The teams have been having to work some strange hours

and shifts! Since the rovers are solar powered, the teams have to

work during Mars daylight hours (which could be the middle of the

night in California/JPL time). Also, the Mars day (or Sol) is about

39 minutes longer than an Earth day --- this means that the shifts

these folks have to work shift in Earth time by 39 minutes. The

MER operations teams have to live on Mars time! I'm willing to bet

that this does not mean they get to have an extra 39 minutes of

sleep per day...

 

You can get more information at the offical MER web site

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mer/ .

 

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Mars Express

 

As of mid-September, Mars Express is working fine and about halfway

to its destination. The initial tests are all out of the way and

the Cruise Phase payload instrument checkouts will be taking place

this month. The Beagle probe will also have such a checkout which

will be later this month and early November.

 

See the offical web site at http://sci.esa.int/marsexpress/ for more information and updates and

http://www.beagle2.com/ for for information on the Beagle probe.

 

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Mars Odyssey

 

The latest Themis images are quite interesting. There is an image

of two craters (http://themis.la.asu.edu/zoom-20031006a.html ) that

have very different erosional histories, some ancient lava flows

just east of Pavonis Mons (http://themis.la.asu.edu/zoom-20030929a.html ),

and finally, a color image from the eastern edge of Acidalia

(http://themis.la.asu.edu/zoom-20031003a.html ). They note that the

colors have been "enhanced" and thus do not represent anything near

what we would call "true color", but the differences in the image

are still striking.

 

You can get more information at the official Odyssey web site

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/odyssey/ .

 

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Mars Global Surveyor

 

The mission is still going strong! The Mars Orbiter Camera has obtained

over 134,000 images of the planet and now they are doing something very

interesting --- letting the public suggest imaging targets! The first

can be seen at http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2003/09/12/index.html

and is the caldera of Pavoinis Mons. If you want to participate and

make your own suggestions, you can get all the details at

http://www.msss.com/plan/intro/ .

 

The TES team continues their data gathering, and present a daily

maps at http://tes.asu.edu/daily.html . They are also computing

a daily atmospheric dust abundance map which you can see at

http://tes.asu.edu . It will be interesting to compare their

results with the brightenings being seen in the MarsWatch images!

 

More information and links to images can be found at

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mgs/

 

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Marswatch WWW site --- http://elvis.rowan.edu/marswatch

 

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Questions, comments, concerns, and contributions to:

David R. Klassen voice: 856-256-4391

Department of Physics & Astronomy fax: 856-256-4478

Rowan University

201 Mullica Hill Road klassen@rowan.edu

Glassboro, NJ 08028 http://elvis.rowan.edu/~klassen

 


David KLASSEN (Dept of Physics & Astronomy, Rowan University, NJ, USA)

klassen@rowan.edu

http://elvis.rowan.edu/~klassen

 


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